Clothespin Puppets

Our Picture Book Show brings to life some of the latest and greatest in children’s literature.  With new books being published (and discovered) all the time, The Picture Book Show is constantly changing and evolving.  We strive to keep the show fresh and updated in the hopes that you never see the same show twice.  Below is a list of the book titles that are currently in rotation in the Picture Book Show and, occasionally, some "coming attractions."

For Halloween we have finally tackled my childhood favorite, the beloved The Monster at the End of This Book by Jon Stone and illustrated by Mike Smollin.   Our newest cast member, Julius, is distressed to learn that there's a monster at the end of this book! He begs readers not to turn the pages, but of course kids feel they just have to see this monster for themselves. Julius is astonished--and toddlers will be delighted--to discover who is really the monster at the end of the book!

The Monster at the End of this Book!

by Jon Stone

illustrated by Mike Smollin

Green Eggs and Ham

by Dr. Seuss

Yes, we dared!  First published on August 12, 1960, Dr. Seuss' eternal classic Green Eggs and Ham is the fourth best-selling English-language children's book of all time.  After years of trying to figure out how to present this in our Picture Book Show, we think we've come up with the perfect solution - a pop-up book!  Will you try it in a house?  Will you try it with a mouse.......

Picture Book Line-Up

If Little Pea doesn't eat all of his sweets, there will be no vegetables for dessert! What's a young pea to do? Children who have trouble swallowing their veggies will love the way this pea-size picture book serves up a playful story they can relate to.


Little Pea

by Amy Krouse Rosenthal

illustrated by Jen Corace

We’ve always been big fans of Mo Willems and his Elephant and Piggie books and have been wanting to get Gerald & Piggie into the act for years.  Well, we’ve finally done it. These wonderful read-aloud books have become one of my favorite kids series, and loved by beginning readers everywhere. These titles are a couple of my favorites because the message is that pretending can be fun and that there is nothing wrong with being silly and playful.

I'm a Frog! and

Pigs Make Me Sneeze!

by Mo Willems

The prince is hoping to fall for Rapunzel, but since she can't quite hear what he asks for, everything but her hair gets tossed out her window. Instead of her curly locks, she throws her dirty socks. Instead of silky tresses, out go lacey dresses. And you can predict the guaranteed-to-crack-kids-up clothing she sends down when the prince simply says hair. . . .Finally Rapunzel heaves out something that makes all the prince's dreams come true, showing how misunderstandings can lead to happily-ever-after.


From the award-winning author of Little Pea, Little Hoot, and Little Oink comes a clever take on the age-old optical illusion: is it a duck or a rabbit? Depends on how you look at it! Readers will find more than just Amy Krouse Rosenthal's signature humor herethere's also a subtle lesson for kids who don't know when to let go of an argument. A smart, simple story that will make readers of all ages eager to take a side, Duck! Rabbit! makes it easy to agree on one thingreading it again!


Falling for Rapunzel

by Leah Wilcox

illustrated by Lydia Monks

Duck! Rabbit!

by Amy Krouse Rosenthal

illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld

The prince is hoping to fall for Rapunzel, but since she can't quite hear what he asks for, everything but her hair gets tossed out her window. Instead of her curly locks, she throws her dirty socks. Instead of silky tresses, out go lacey dresses. And you can predict the guaranteed-to-crack-kids-up clothing she sends down when the prince simply says hair. . . .Finally Rapunzel heaves out something that makes all the prince's dreams come true, showing how misunderstandings can lead to happily-ever-after.


From the award-winning author of Little Pea, Little Hoot, and Little Oink comes a clever take on the age-old optical illusion: is it a duck or a rabbit? Depends on how you look at it! Readers will find more than just Amy Krouse Rosenthal's signature humor herethere's also a subtle lesson for kids who don't know when to let go of an argument. A smart, simple story that will make readers of all ages eager to take a side, Duck! Rabbit! makes it easy to agree on one thingreading it again!


Falling for Rapunzel

by Leah Wilcox

illustrated by Lydia Monks

Duck! Rabbit!

by Amy Krouse Rosenthal

illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld

The Princess Elizabeth is slated to marry Prince Ronald when a dragon attacks the castle and kidnaps Ronald. In resourceful and humorous fashion, Elizabeth finds the dragon, outsmarts him, and rescues Ronald--who is less than pleased at her un-princess-like appearance.


It's hard to imagine a world without A Light in the Attic. This now-classic collection of poetry and drawings from Shel Silverstein celebrates its 20th anniversary with this special edition. Silverstein's humorous and creative verse can amuse the dowdiest of readers. Lemon-faced adults and fidgety kids sit still and read these rhythmic words and laugh and smile and love that Silverstein.


Deep in the sea there lives a happy school of little fish. Their watery world is full of wonders, but there is also danger, and the little fish are afraid to come out of hiding . . . until Swimmy comes along. Swimmy shows his friends how—with ingenuity and team work—they can overcome any danger. With its graceful text and stunning artwork, this Caldecott Honor Book deserves a place on every child’s shelf.


It’s time for the little red chicken’s bedtime story —and a reminder from Papa to try not to interrupt. But the chicken can’t help herself! Whatever the tale, she jumps into the story to save its hapless characters from doing some dangerous or silly thing. Now it’s the little red chicken’s turn to tell a story, but will her yawning papa make it to the end without his own kind of interrupting?



When author and artist David Shannon was five years old, he wrote a semi-autobiographical story of a little kid who broke all his mother's rules. He chewed with his mouth open (and full of food), he jumped on the furniture, and he broke his mother's vase! As a result, all David ever heard his mother say was "No, David!" Here is his story.


Caldecott Award-winning author-artist Ed Emberley has created an ingenious way for children to chase away their nighttime fears. Kids can turn the pages of this die-cut book and watch the Big Green Monster grow. Then, when they're ready to show him who's in charge, they'll turn the remaining pages and watch him disappear! This lavish reissue features dramatic die-cut eyes and sparkling foil on the cover.

The Paper Bag Princess

by Robert Munsch

illustrated by Michael Martchenko

A Light in the Attic

poems and drawings by

Shel Silverstein

Swimmy

by Leo Lionni

Interrupting Chicken

by David Ezra Stein

No, David!

by David Shannon

Go Away,

Big Green Monster!

by Ed Emberley

Seasonal Attractions!

Creak...

Crash...

BOO!


Seven spine-tingling stories featuring shivering skeletons, ghostly pirates, chattering corpses, and haunted graveyards...all to chill your bones!

Christmas is coming, and Cat has a hunch he's not on Santa's "nice" list. Which means? No presents for Cat. So he tries to be good, but children, it seems, aren't wild for his brand of gift-giving. Still, Cat might surprise himself, and best of all, he may just get to meet the man in the red suit himself—and receive a holiday surprise of his own.


In a Dark, Dark Room

retold by Alvin Schwartz

illustrated by Dirk Zimmer

Here Comes Santa Cat

by Deborah Underwood

illustrated by Claudia Rueda

As a little girl tours and twirls through the halls of the art museum, she finds herself on an exciting adventure. Each piece of art evokes something new inside of her. When confronted with an empty white canvas, she is energized to create and express herself—which is the greatest feeling of all.

With exuberant illustrations by Peter H. Reynolds, The Museum playfully captures the many emotions experienced through the power of art, and each child’s unique creative process.

The Museum

by Susan Verde

illustrated by Peter H. Reynolds

Since it was first published anonymously in 1823, “The Night Before Christmas” has enchanted children with the story of St. Nicholas climbing down the chimney and filling all the stockings before springing back to his sleigh. Many families read the poem every year, and now Clothespin Puppets has thier shadow puppet version to offer.

The Night

Before Christmas

by Clement C. Moore

illustrated by Charles Santore

Parts by Tedd Arnold is a children's picture book about a boy who thinks he is falling apart. He notices hair coming out in his comb and thinks he is already going bald at age 5. A booger falls out of his nose and he assumes his brain is falling out. His teeth also start to come lose and he thinks there is glue that holds people together and his is coming undone. He worries about what else he is going to lose so he wraps himself in his dad's masking tape. When his parents find him, they explain he is not falling apart, and all of these changes are natural.

Parts

by Tedd Arnold